Bone Broth

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I’m learning that quality broth is one of the most important ingredients for making delicious food. Broth, also called stock, is used in all kinds of dishes, from braises to soups to stir fry dishes.

Additionally, bone broth is supposed to be like a super multi-vitamin. When I checked out some recent news, I realized that there’s a new craze about broth (particularly the term “bone broth” which might be attributed to Kobe Bryant’s rave about it). I don’t believe that broth will fix all health issues (check out this NPR article), but we do try to incorporate more broth when we’re sick. And besides, it really does make my food taste better. And it’s usually cheaper (unless you’re buying the concentrated stuff from Costco).

Making my own broth has been one of the easier things I’ve learned on this whole food journey. While it takes some time to locate quality ingredients, it doesn’t take much hands-on work (although it does need to simmer for like 12-24 hours).

Here’s my version:

  • 5 pounds bones (I save bones from our meals and buy whatever grass-fed or organic is cheapest; this time I found lamb bones for $2.99/lb)
  • ½ cup raw apple cider vinegar
  • 2 onions, quartered
  • 3 celery stocks, washed and broken into pieces
  • 2 carrots, washed and broken into pieces
  • filtered water
  1. Fill a large stockpot with bones. Cover with vinegar and let sit at room temperature for an hour.
  2. Add all other ingredients and cover everything with filtered water. I add about a gallon or two of water (I haven’t measured, so I’m picturing milk jugs to guesstimate).
  3. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 12-24 hours.
  4. Strain the solids (you can store them in the freezer to make another batch, although the stock will be weaker).
  5. Put the broth in the fridge. The fat will freeze on the top for easy removal. If you’re feeling brave, you can use that fat to make pemmican (this fat can be used in place of the rendered fat in the recipe).
  6. Store the stock in the fridge and/or freezer. I put some in the fridge and freeze the rest in ice cube trays for easy use later.

    Right before the broth finished cooking.

    Right before the broth finished cooking.

Here the solids are strained from the liquid.

Here the solids are strained from the liquid.

The fat solidified at the top.

The fat solidified at the top.

Fat removal. I gave it to my dog, Nala...it didn't go over too well. So I don't recommend giving it to your dog. I'm always learning something.

Fat removal. I gave it to my dog, Nala…it didn’t go over too well. So I don’t recommend giving it to your dog. I’m always learning something.

My other resources for broth recipes and info are Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and The Elliott Homestead: From Scratch by Shaye Elliott. I also love everything Wellness Mama; here’s her recipe and benefits of bone broth.


Hope you enjoy it! We sometimes drink a cup or make a quick soup with whatever leftover veggies and protein and spices we have on hand. I’d love to hear how you use broth. Share your comments below 🙂

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